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Oklahoma beats Texas — with defense — to make a case for College Football Playoff

Oklahoma beats Texas — with defense — to make a case for College Football Playoff

ARLINGTON, Tex. — The uncommonness of the rematch, the glory of the stage and the route football in the Big 12 skews only somewhat zanier prepared school football watchers to expect a couple of wanders aimlessly in the 114th gathering of Texas and Oklahoma, the first to happen in a meeting title amusement. 

Yet, that it was No. 5 Oklahoma's guard that swung its 39-27 triumph Saturday over No. 14 Texas rather than its great offense, the large unit driven by falling star of a quarterback, Kyler Murray? That may have been the greatest amazement of all. 

With 8:27 to play and the Sooners grasping a noteworthy lead, sophomore cornerback Tre Brown got Sam Ehlinger looking the other path on a rush and plunged toward the quarterback's right side, thumping him down at last zone for security that made the score 32-27 and immovably put energy on Oklahoma's side. It was the Sooners' first security in five years. 

"It was the first occasion when I blitzed today," Brown said with a grin, "and I felt like the mentors completed great employment recognizing what was happening. They made an incredible call and sent me at the correct time, and I returned home and got it going." 

Dark colored and whatever is left of a censured resistance adjusted Oklahoma's case for consideration in the College Football Playoff. 

With the win, the Sooners' list of qualifications incorporates a triumph over each adversary on its calendar, three best 20 triumphs, a fourth continuous Big 12 title (making them the principal group to win four straight through and through alliance titles since Florida in the mid-1990s) and a guard that can, authoritatively, win amusements. 

[College football victors and failures: Championship week edition] 

"You must win by one point in these diversions the if I'm not mistaken," Oklahoma Coach Lincoln Riley said when asked whether he supposes his group is playing all around ok to win the national title. "I feel like we can score focuses on individuals, and I feel like we can stop individuals. Furthermore, . . . I feel like we're picking up footing protectively. I feel like we've had our most astounding exhibitions over the most recent few weeks in colossal recreations against dynamic offenses, and I don't think we've played our best yet this year. What's more, I believe we will arrive." 

Oklahoma (12-1) beat Texas (9-4) on the two sides of the ball in an amusement in which the scale fit the stakes. Saturday was the first run through since 1903 — Oklahoma was four years from statehood — that the Sooners and Longhorns met for the second time in one season. They played an enormous AT&T Stadium before a horde of 83,114 — 23 a higher number of individuals than went to the 1992 SEC title, making Saturday the most significant group to observe a gathering title diversion. 

The Sooners' barrier, maybe the most censored in the nation entering Saturday after its past four rivals arrived at the midpoint of more than 47, and it surrendered 56 and 539 passing yards a week ago in a win at West Virginia, came through when it made a difference most. 

It wasn't flawless. Oklahoma had a two-score lead dissipate in the second from last quarter on account of Ehlinger and astonishing beneficiaries Collin Johnson and Lil'Jordan Humphrey. In any case, the Sooners didn't enable Texas to score at all in the final quarter, and they concocted security and a capture, supporting an offense that had 508 yards to Texas' 437. 

Murray, as far as it matters for him, amazed not surprisingly. He finished 25 of 34 goes for 379 yards and three touchdowns, was sacked twice and submitted no turnovers. 

Ehlinger combat on the opposite side, finishing 23 of 36 endeavors for 349 yards. He went for two touchdowns with one block attempt and scrambled for two more scores. Oklahoma's resistance sacked him multiple times, yet maybe the most significant injuries Texas endured were self-incurred. The Longhorns surrendered 128 yards on 13 punishments, and the Sooners exploited. 

"It's something we discussed the previous evening at our gathering in secret, yet we had a feeling that we played together on all sides of the ball," Murray said. "That is a decent collaborate there in West Virginia. However, I feel like we got ourselves. Barrier came up huge a week ago and this week." 

Murray, apparently the main Heisman Trophy competitor who hasn't been left in Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa's residue now, fixed the win when he whipped the ball straight into one hunting hand of Grant Calcaterra down the last score — and Calcaterra's second score of the amusement — with two minutes left. By at that point, Oklahoma fans who had been muffled throughout the day by Texas' marginally bigger unforeseen were plainly reciting "We need 'Bama." 

As much as it longs for a diversion with the safeguarding champs, Oklahoma knows its compartment in the College Football Playoff relies upon such a large number of different elements for the Sooners to feel excessively sure about their consideration. 

"We've given it all that we have. . . . We'll give the council a chance to carry out their activity," Riley said. "They have a lot of beneficial things to take a gander at from this group today. I'm certain they were tuned in and watching this, and on the off chance that they did, they saw outstanding amongst other groups in the nation."

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